THURSDAY 30
8:00 p.m.

JAÉN
University’s Aula Magna

 

YOLOTLI. CORO DE MUJERES DE LOS PUEBLOS INDÍGENAS DE MÉXICO
Leticia Armijo, director

 

Heart of green stone: Mesoamerican indigenous musics
(sixteenth to eighteenth centuries)

 

In Mexico, from the pre-Hispanic period, the musical education was of high quality, as the musicians enjoyed privileges and prestige; this is confirmed by several sources. For example, manuscripts such as the Florentino describe the musical training received by young people in the Tepuchcalli. During the Viceroyalty (1521-1821) the musical teaching took place in Mexican convents and cathedrals. The indigenous musical talent also resulted in the creation of liturgical works, villancicos, four-part polyphony and Masses. In addition to this, anonymous pieces in nahuatl, kanjobal and other Mayan dialects will bring us closer to the musical life in Guatemala.

PROGRAM

FIRST PART

Gaspar Fernández (1563/71-1629)1
Xicochi conetzintle (4vv)
Jesós de mi coraçón (4vv)

Anonymous / Hernando Franco (c.1530-1585)?2
Sancta Maria (4vv)
Dios iztlaconantzine (4vv)

Anónimo (Huehuetenango, Guatemala, 1582-1635)3
Bay magalhi (4vv?)

Magalhi vicam dios (4vv)     

Y technepa (4vv)

Dios nimahau (4vv)

Jesu Cristo te esi col (4vv)

Vachon loj ibanqinal (4vv)

Santa Maria (1v?)

Vae bguih santa (1v?)

SECOND PART

Tomás Calvo (fl.1726)
Eight villancicos (San Sebastián Lemoa, Guatemala, 1726)4

Hoy de Pedro cantemos (4vv)
Resuelto en lenguas de Pedro (2vv)
Los desagravios despican (3vv)
Hola zagales del valle (4vv)
Agnus Dei (5vv)
Sube triunfante señora (4vv)
Lindo Convite (3vv)
Alarma, alarma (1v)

Duration: 60’

Sources and transcriptions:
(1) Cancionero poético-musical de Gaspar Fernández, Catedral de Oaxaca, 1609-1616
(2) Códice Valdés, Seminario Mayor Conciliar de México, ca. 1620
(3) Manuscritos guatemaltecos, Lilly Library, Bloomington (s. XVII)
(4) Vocabulario quiché, Princeton University Library (1726)
Transcriptions by Aurelio Tello (1), Gabriel Saldívar (2), Sheila Baird y Paul Borg (3) and Paulo Alvarado (4)

We thank Javier Marín for providing us with the materials of this program

IN COLLABORATION WITH THE AGENCIA MEXICANA DE COOPERACIÓN INTERNACIONAL PARA EL DESARROLLO, SECRETARÍA DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES OF MEXICO AND AEROMÉXICO

     

 

Ana Andrade, soprano
Lucía Delgado, soprano
Jaqueline Zarate, mezzo-soprano
Batseba Camacho, mezzo-soprano
Claudia Rivero, contralto
Jennifer Friedman, contralto

Leticia Armijo, director

Leticia Armijo, director. Considered to be one of the most prolific female composers of Mexico, her music has been performed by distinguished musicians in Mexico, France, Japan, Portugal, Cuba, Spain and Austria. As an investigator specialized in the subject of Mexican women in music, she has dictated master conferences in México, Austria, Cuba, United States and Spain. In 2007 she was awarded with The SACM Award of Symphonic Composition and the Electro-acoustic Composition Award that gives the Department of Culture and Education through the Laboratory of Computer Music in Spain. Such award will be granted to her again in 2009. She is awarded by the SACM with the Trayectoria 2013 and in 2017 she receives recognition Juana Belén Gutiérrez de Mendoza, granted by the National Feminist Front. Armijo graduated from Bachelor in Composition with honors, Master in Promotion and Management of Music and the Doctorate in History and Science of Music from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), with Cum Laude mention. Intern of FONCA and the UAM, she has done two post doctorates in composition at Universidad de Granada and at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.

Yolotli, Choir of Women of the Indigenous Peoples of Mexico. Founded by the Mexican composer Leticia Armijo in 2007, it was created with the mission of preserving the languages and musical traditions of the indigenous peoples of Mexico, integrating women from these historically marginalized groups into the large formats of concert music in Mexico. The repertoire of the choir is part of the traditional songs of Mexico in indigenous languages such as Nahuatl, purépecha, tsotsil, kumiai-kiliwa, triqui, seri, zapoteco, mayo, tojolwinik’otik and papago, also integrating works representative of the choral repertoire in these languages in the process of extinction and historically marginalized, transcribed and arranged by its director and founder, Leticia Armijo.

 

YOUTUBE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EmN06PDoqY

WEB & SOCIAL NETWORKS

https://www.yolotlis.org/
https://comuarte.org/yolotli/
https://www.facebook.com/Yolotlis/
https://twitter.com/YolotliCoro