MONDAY 4
21:00 p.m.

BAEZA
Capilla del Antiguo Seminario de San Felipe Neri (UNIA)

RICARDO MIRANDA, piano

Three pictures of salon music in nineteenth-century Mexico
(commented concert)

This programme hovers above three significant moments in the history of Mexican salon music of the nineteenth century. First Mariano Elízaga’s Últimas variaciones, so far the earliest score printed in Mexico (c.1826). Second, pieces by renowned musicians associated with the establishment of the Conservatorio Nacional de Música, one-hundred and fifty years ago. Third and last, it offers music by the young Manuel M. Ponce, long recognized as one of Mexico’s most prominent composers and a leading figure within the Mexican Romantic repertoire.

PROGRAM

I.
Luis Hahn (m.1873)
“Villa de Guadalupe, galop del ferrocarril”, de la suite Recuerdos de México (1861)

José Mariano Elízaga Prado (1786-1842)
Últimas variaciones (c.1826)

II.
Aniceto Ortega del Villar (1825-1875)
Elegía, op. 7, n. 7 (c.1866)

Henry Brinley Richards (1817-1885)
En su ausencia, nocturno

Guadalupe Olmedo Lama (1856-1889)
Segunda rêverie, op. 28

III.
Manuel M. Ponce (1882-1948)
Tres piezas para piano
Primer Intermezzo (c.1917)
Gavota (1909)
Vespertina (1909)*

Balada Mexicana (1914)

Duration: 60’

* Premiere in modern times

ACTIVITY OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS “DE NUEVA ESPAÑA A MÉXICO: EL UNIVERSO MUSICAL MEXICANO ENTRE CENTENARIOS (1517-1917)”

IN COLLABORATION WITH UNIVERSIDAD INTERNACIONAL DE ANDALUCÍA

 

Ricardo Miranda, piano

Ricardo Miranda, piano. He studied piano at the Centro de Investigación y Estudios Musicales in Mexico City and later in London, England, where he was a student of Nelly Ben-Or. He also studied theory, analysis and composition with Dr. Hans Heimler. In 1989 he obtained, with distinctions, a Master’s degree in Arts with a specialization in Music Performance Studies at the City University of London and in 1992 he obtained a Doctor of Musicology degree from the same university. As a pianist, he received advice from Alicia de Larrocha and Radu Lupu, who described him as “a capable musician, possessing extraordinary musical intelligence”. Recognized internationally as a specialist in Mexican music, he was described by Robert Stevenson as a “brilliant musicologist”.